Ireland

Spotlight on Ireland

It's said that Ireland, once visited, is never forgotten, and for once the blarney rings true. The Irish landscape has a mythic resonance, due as much to the country's almost tangible history as its claim to being the home of the fairies and the 'little people'. Sure, the weather may not always be clement, but the dampness ensures there are fifty shades of green to compensate - just one of the reasons Ireland is called the Emerald Isle.

Dublin enjoys one of the loveliest natural settings in Europe. Dublin attracts visitors from around the world with its old world charm and friendly atmosphere. Most of the architecture dates from the 18th century, when Dublin enjoyed great prominence and prosperity. Also of interest are stately Georgian houses which front Merrion Square. O’Connell Street is considered the commercial center of Dublin. Perhaps the most memorable feature of Dublin is the traditional pub, where visitors can enjoy conversation over fine Irish brew. The city also offers many fine parks, including St. Stephen’s Green and Phoenix Park. National Gallery's renowned collection includes works by such famous masters as Rembrandt and Monet. Trinity College's Old Library is home to the most cherished treasure, the Book of Kells, a manuscript of the Gospels. Admire Christ Church Cathedral and St. Patrick’s Cathedral. Enjoy the exhibits in impressive National Museum. Self-guided walking tours include Old City Trail, Georgian Heritage Trail and the Cultural Trail.

Cork – A town of churches, bridges and pubs, Cork is best known for Blarney Castle where you are invited to kiss the famed stone to acquire the "gift of gab." St. Patrick Street, the town's main thoroughfare, is good for shopping and people watching. See the Shandon bells in St. Anne's church. Those who are willing to climb the 134 winding steps to the top of the steeple will be rewarded with a wondrous view of the city, harbor and hills.

Ennis – A place where a blend of visitors and entertainment combine to create an atmosphere synonymous with Irish tradition at its very best and of times well spent. If it’s music and "craic" you are looking for, seek out the pub/bar most suitable to your liking. For a more relaxed atmosphere visit the cinema. If it’s delights of the culinary nature that tickle your taste buds, then make sure to check out one of our many restaurants, specializing in traditional Irish dishes to both European and Eastern creations. When festival time comes round, Ennis and the county of Clare are where it’s all happening!

Killarney - Developed by Lord Kenmare as a tourist town in the 18th century, Killarney is now the major tourist centre and accommodation base in Kerry. It is the centre for the Ring of Kerry tour, the focal point for the Killarney National Park and the Kerry Way Walking Trail.

Donegal - The county of Donegal contains breathtaking views of landscapes and seascapes set against a backdrop of mountains and moors, with evidence everywhere of traditional Irish Celtic culture. Its vast rugged coastline is mixed with beautiful beaches with golden sand and crystal clear waters. In addition to Donegal’s spectacular vistas, other major attractions include Glenveagh National Park and Castle, Glebe House and Gallery, Tory Island, Abbey Mill Wheels, Fort Dunree Military Museum, Colmcille Heritage Center and many interesting Celtic ruins.

Shannon – From Shannon, visitors can set out on open roads and discover stunning Atlantic coastal beauty, and ever changing landscapes, in an atmosphere as friendly as the air is pure. The Shannon Region - which is less than 100 miles from end to end will provide abiding memories - great beauty, great activity and great fun in a holiday playground carved out by nature. Limerick City is the capital of the region. The great Shannon River, the longest river in Ireland and the U.K, flows through its centre and gives the region its name.

 

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Agents who have been to Ireland...